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7.24-JUST DROPPED IN (TO SEE WHAT CONDITION MY CONDITION WAS IN) (First Edition)

First Edition

LISTEN

[Intro]

Yeah, yeah, oh-yeah, what condition my condition was in.

I woke up this morning with the sundown shinin’ in.
I found my mind in a brown paper bag, but then...
I tripped on a cloud and fell eight miles high.
I tore my mind on a jagged sky.
I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in.

[Refrain]

I pushed my soul in a deep dark hole and then I followed it in.
I watched myself crawling out as I was a-crawlin' in.
I got up so tight I couldn't unwind;
I saw so much I broke my mind.
I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in.

[Break]

[Refrain]

Someone painted "April Fool" in big black letters on a dead end sign.
I had my foot on the gas as I left the road and blew out my mind.
Eight miles outta Memphis and I got no spare.
Eight miles strayed up downtown somewhere.
I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in. (2x)

Yeah yeah oh-yeah

[Coda]


Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In) was the first hit by country music singer Kenny Rogers, who was then with the First Edition. It was the only attempt at psychedelic music that Kenny Rogers did that I'm aware of. The song was written by Mickey Newbury, reportedly known around Nashville as the “hippie-cowboy”, who would also write such songs as San Francisco Mabel Joy, performed by Waylon Jennings, and An American Trilogy, performed by Elvis Presley. Just Dropped In was Nashville’s first successful adaptation to psychedelic aesthetics, a feat rarely repeated in the genre. It sounded like a psychedelic record with its intro of backwards guitar, its chorus recorded in exaggerated tremolo, and Glen Campbell’s heavily compressed guitar break. It even had a thrice repeated allusion to the Byrd’s psychedelic song Eight Miles High. But its country narrative, instead of praising alternate consciousness, seemed to warn that an LSD trip has the possibility of being like a car crash. As back in the early days of psychedelia in 1966, with such songs as the novelty record They’re Coming to Take Me Away Ha Ha by Napoleon XIV, pop music was again expressing the fear that hallucinogens would make you go insane.

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